Table of Contents

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  1. Preface
  2. Introduction to Data Transformation
  3. Data Processor Transformation
  4. Wizard Input and Output Formats
  5. Relational Input and Output
  6. Using the IntelliScript Editor
  7. XMap
  8. Libraries
  9. Schema Object
  10. Command Line Interface
  11. Scripts
  12. Parsers
  13. Script Ports
  14. Document Processors
  15. Formats
  16. Data Holders
  17. Anchors
  18. Transformers
  19. Actions
  20. Serializers
  21. Mappers
  22. Locators, Keys, and Indexing
  23. Streamers
  24. Validators, Notifications, and Failure Handling
  25. Validation Rules
  26. Custom Script Components

Data Transformation User Guide

Data Transformation User Guide

Regular Expression Syntax

Regular Expression Syntax

A regular expression defines a search pattern according to a standard syntax.
The Data Processor transformation uses the Regex++ implementation of regular expressions, © 1998-2003 by Dr. John Maddock, Version 1.33, 18 April 2000.
Regex++ does not support locales.
The following table lists some special characters that you can use in regular expressions:
Character
Meaning
Example
*
Matches zero or more instances of the preceding character.
ab*c
matches
ac
,
abc
, or
abbbc
.
?
Matches zero or one instance of the preceding character.
ab?c
matches
ac
or
abc
.
+
Matches one or more instances of the preceding character.
a+
matches
a
or
aaaa
.
{}
Matches the specified number of instances of the preceding character.
ab{2}c
matches
abbc
.
[]
Matches any of a set of characters.
a[bst]c
matches
abc
,
asc
, or
atc
.
-
Defines a range of characters inside square brackets.
[A-Za-z]
matches any character in the English alphabet.
[A-Za-zü]
matches any character in the English alphabet or the German
ü
.
.
Matches any single character.
a.c
matches
abc
,
a c
, or
a1c
.
^
Matches the start of the input text.
^P.
matches
Pe
but not
Pi
in "Peter Piper."
$
Matches the end of the input text.
r.$
matches
rs
in "Peter Piper's peppers."
|
Matches either of two expressions.
abc|ded
matches
abc
or
def
.
()
Grouping
A(abc|def)
matches
Aabc
or
Adef
.
\
Escapes one of the other special characters, treating it as a literal character.
\.
matches a literal period, rather than any character.


Updated September 25, 2018