Table of Contents

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  1. Preface
  2. Understanding Pipeline Partitioning
  3. Partition Points
  4. Partition Types
  5. Pushdown Optimization
  6. Pushdown Optimization Transformations
  7. Real-time Processing
  8. Commit Points
  9. Row Error Logging
  10. Workflow Recovery
  11. Stopping and Aborting
  12. Concurrent Workflows
  13. Grid Processing
  14. Load Balancer
  15. Workflow Variables
  16. Parameters and Variables in Sessions
  17. Parameter Files
  18. FastExport
  19. External Loading
  20. FTP
  21. Session Caches
  22. Incremental Aggregation
  23. Session Log Interface
  24. Understanding Buffer Memory
  25. High Precision Data
  26. POWERCENTERHELP

Advanced Workflow Guide

Advanced Workflow Guide

Comparing the Output of the Integration Service and Databases

Comparing the Output of the Integration Service and Databases

The Integration Service and databases can produce different results when processing the same transformation logic. The Integration Service sometimes converts data to a different format when it reads data. The Integration Service and database may also handle null values, case sensitivity, and sort order differently.
The database and Integration Service produce different output when the following settings and conversions are different:
  • Nulls treated as the highest or lowest value
    . The Integration Service and a database can treat null values differently. For example, you want to push a Sorter transformation to an Oracle database. In the session, you configure nulls as the lowest value in the sort order. Oracle treats null values as the highest value in the sort order.
  • Sort order
    . The Integration Service and a database can use different sort orders. For example, you want to push the transformations in a session to a Microsoft SQL Server database, which is configured to use a sort order that is not case sensitive. You configure the session properties to use the binary sort order, which is case sensitive. The results differ based on whether the Integration Service or Microsoft SQL Server database process the transformation logic.
  • Case sensitivity.
    The Integration Service and a database can treat case sensitivity differently. For example, the Integration Service uses case sensitive queries and the database does not. A Filter transformation uses the following filter condition: IIF(col_varchar2 = ‘CA’, TRUE, FALSE). You need the database to return rows that match ‘CA.’ However, if you push this transformation logic to a Microsoft SQL Server database that is not case sensitive, it returns rows that match the values ‘Ca,’ ‘ca,’ ‘cA,’ and ‘CA.’
  • Numeric values converted to character values
    . The Integration Service and a database can convert the same numeric value to a character value in different formats. The database can convert numeric values to an unacceptable character format. For example, a table contains the number 1234567890. When the Integration Service converts the number to a character value, it inserts the characters ‘1234567890.’ However, a database might convert the number to ‘1.2E9.’ The two sets of characters represent the same value. However, if you require the characters in the format ‘1234567890,’ you can disable pushdown optimization.
  • Precision
    . The Integration Service and a database can have different precision for particular datatypes. Transformation datatypes use a default numeric precision that can vary from the native datatypes. For example, a transformation Decimal datatype has a precision of 1-28. The corresponding Teradata Decimal datatype has a precision of 1-18. The results can vary if the database uses a different precision than the Integration Service.


Updated July 04, 2018