Table of Contents

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  1. Preface
  2. Understanding Pipeline Partitioning
  3. Partition Points
  4. Partition Types
  5. Pushdown Optimization
  6. Pushdown Optimization Transformations
  7. Real-time Processing
  8. Commit Points
  9. Row Error Logging
  10. Workflow Recovery
  11. Stopping and Aborting
  12. Concurrent Workflows
  13. Grid Processing
  14. Load Balancer
  15. Workflow Variables
  16. Parameters and Variables in Sessions
  17. Parameter Files
  18. FastExport
  19. External Loading
  20. FTP
  21. Session Caches
  22. Incremental Aggregation
  23. Session Log Interface
  24. Understanding Buffer Memory
  25. High Precision Data
  26. POWERCENTERHELP

Advanced Workflow Guide

Advanced Workflow Guide

Parameter and Variable Types

Parameter and Variable Types

A parameter file can contain different types of parameters and variables. When you run a session or workflow that uses a parameter file, the Integration Service reads the parameter file and expands the parameters and variables defined in the file.
You can define the following types of parameter and variable in a parameter file:
  • Service variables.
    Define general properties for the Integration Service such as email addresses, log file counts, and error thresholds. $PMSuccessEmailUser, $PMSessionLogCount, and $PMSessionErrorThreshold are examples of service variables. The service variable values you define in the parameter file override the values that are set in the Administrator tool.
  • Service process variables.
    Define the directories for Integration Service files for each Integration Service process. $PMRootDir, $PMSessionLogDir, and $PMBadFileDir are examples of service process variables. The service process variable values you define in the parameter file override the values that are set in the Administrator tool. If the Integration Service uses operating system profiles, the operating system user specified in the operating system profile must have access to the directories you define for the service process variables.
  • Workflow variables.
    Evaluate task conditions and record information in a workflow. For example, you can use a workflow variable in a Decision task to determine whether the previous task ran properly. In a workflow, $
    TaskName
    .PrevTaskStatus is a predefined workflow variable and $$
    VariableName
    is a user-defined workflow variable.
  • Worklet variables
    . Evaluate task conditions and record information in a worklet. You can use predefined worklet variables in a parent workflow, but you cannot use workflow variables from the parent workflow in a worklet. In a worklet, $
    TaskName
    .PrevTaskStatus is a predefined worklet variable and $$
    VariableName
    is a user-defined worklet variable.
  • Session parameters.
    Define values that can change from session to session, such as database connections or file names. $PMSessionLogFile and $Param
    Name
    are user-defined session parameters.
  • Mapping parameters.
    Define values that remain constant throughout a session, such as state sales tax rates. When declared in a mapping or mapplet, $$
    ParameterName
    is a user-defined mapping parameter.
  • Mapping variables.
    Define values that can change during a session. The Integration Service saves the value of a mapping variable to the repository at the end of each successful session run and uses that value the next time you run the session. When declared in a mapping or mapplet, $$
    VariableName
    is a mapping variable.
You cannot define the following types of variables in a parameter file:
  • $Source and $Target connection variables.
    Define the database location for a relational source, relational target, lookup table, or stored procedure.
  • Email variables.
    Define session information in an email message such as the number of rows loaded, the session completion time, and read and write statistics.
  • Local variables.
    Temporarily store data in variable ports in Aggregator, Expression, and Rank transformations.
  • Built-in variables.
    Variables that return run-time or system information, such as Integration Service name or system date.
  • Transaction control variables.
    Define conditions to commit or rollback transactions during the processing of database rows.
  • ABAP program variables.
    Represent SAP structures, fields in SAP structures, or values in the ABAP program.


Updated July 04, 2018