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  1. Preface
  2. Introduction to PowerExchange
  3. DBMOVER Configuration File
  4. Netport Jobs
  5. PowerExchange Message Logs and Destination Overrides
  6. SMF Statistics Logging and Reporting
  7. PowerExchange Security
  8. Secure Sockets Layer Support
  9. PowerExchange Alternative Network Security
  10. PowerExchange Nonrelational SQL
  11. PowerExchange Globalization
  12. Using the PowerExchange ODBC Drivers
  13. PowerExchange Datatypes and Conversion Matrix
  14. DTL__CAPXTIMESTAMP Time Stamps
  15. PowerExchange Glossary

PowerExchange Alternative Log Files

PowerExchange Alternative Log Files

PowerExchange can dynamically allocate a set of alternative log files for logging messages.
Use of PowerExchange alternative log files has the following benefits:
  • PowerExchange uses multiple files for logging messages. When the current log file becomes full, PowerExchange can switch to the next log file, thereby preventing out-of-space conditions.
  • After opening an alternative log file, PowerExchange buffers messages so that they can be written to a log file on disk at a specified interval. This buffering reduces the amount of open, close, and write activity on the file to improve performance and resource usage.
  • You can control the size and number of alternative log files and the frequency with which PowerExchange flushes the log records to the file.
To configure PowerExchange to use alternative log files, define the TRACING statement in the DBMOVER configuration file. When alternative logging is enabled, PowerExchange writes runtime messages from PowerExchange components, programs, and commands to a set of alternative log files that are used on a rotating basis. By default, PowerExchange dynamically allocates five alternative log files.
PowerExchange continues to write initial startup messages to the primary PowerExchange message log file.
On z/OS only, you can add DTLLOG
nn
DD statements in the JCL for a PowerExchange component that logs messages to alternative log data sets if you do not want to use the TRACING statement to dynamically allocate the alternative log data sets. Manual allocation by the DD statements overrides dynamic allocation. To send the message output to a JES2 or JES3 SYSOUT file rather than to a data set that you specify, enter a single DLTLLOG01 DD statement in the JCL that specifies the SYSOUT parameter. By using SYSOUT, you can keep the output from a single PowerExchange Listener execution with the rest of the job output. If you use dynamic allocation, PowerExchange dynamically creates a set of log data sets in a separate directory for each PowerExchange process. Alternatively, you can specify a DD statement that points to the current GDG(0). If you set APPEND=Y in the TRACING statement, PowerExchange appends messages to the end of the current GDG.
To name the alternative log files, PowerExchange uses the PFX=
prefix
value that you specify in the TRACING statement. The following table describes how the format of the file name varies by operating system and component:
Operating System
Log File Name Format
i5/OS
The PowerExchange Listener uses the following file-naming convention:
datalib
/P
listener_port
(
prefixnnn
)
PowerExchange Condense and other PowerExchange jobs use the following file-naming convention:
datalib
/JOB
job_number
(
prefixnnn
)
The variables in these names are:
  • datalib
    . The PowerExchange data library name specified during PowerExchange installation.
  • job_number
    . The
    i5/OS
    job number for the tracing subtask, DTLTRTSK, that runs under PowerExchange Condense or other PowerExchange jobs.
  • listener_port
    . The PowerExchange Listener port number.
  • prefixnnn
    is the PFX parameter value with an appended sequential number from 001 through 999.
Linux and UNIX
The PowerExchange Listener uses the following file-naming convention:
logpath
/
prefix
/DTLLST1.p
listener_port
.n
nnn
.log
The PowerExchange Logger for Linux, UNIX, and Windows uses the following file-naming convention:
logpath
/
prefix
/PWXCCL.t
yyyymmddhhmmss
.p
pid
.n
nnn
.log
Other tasks use the following file-naming convention:
logpath
/
prefix
/
module
.t
yyyymmddhhmmss
.p
pid
.n
nnn
.log
The variables in these names are:
  • logpath
    . The value of the LOGPATH statement in the dbmover.cfg file.
  • prefix
    is the PFX parameter value.
  • listener_port
    . The PowerExchange Listener port number.
  • module
    . The name of the PowerExchange module that is running, such as DTLURDMO for the DTLURDMO utility or DTLODBCDRVR for PowerCenter operations.
  • nnn
    . A sequential number from 001 through 999.
  • pid
    . The process ID of the PowerExchange task.
  • yyyymmddhhmmss
    . The time stamp for the point in time when the file was created.
Windows
The PowerExchange Listener uses the following file-naming convention:
logpath
\
prefix
\DTLLST1.p
listener_port
.n
nnn
.log
A PowerExchange Listener Service uses the following file-naming convention:
logpath
\
prefix
\DTLLSTNT.p
listener_port
.n
nnn
.log
The PowerExchange Logger for Linux, UNIX, and Windows uses the following file-naming convention:
logpath
\
prefix
\PWXCCL.t
yyyymmddhhmmss
.p
pid
.n
nnn
.log
Other tasks use the following file-naming convention:
logpath
\
prefix
\
module
.t
yyyymmddhhmmss
.p
pid
.n
nnn
.log
The variables in these names are:
  • logpath
    . The value of the LOGPATH statement in the dbmover.cfg file.
  • prefix
    is the PFX parameter value.
  • listener_port
    . The PowerExchange Listener port number.
  • module
    . The name of the PowerExchange module that is running, such as DTLURDMO for the DTLURDMO utility or DTLODBCDRVR for PowerCenter operations.
  • nnn
    . A sequential number from 001 through 999.
  • pid
    . The process ID of the PowerExchange task.
  • yyyymmddhhmmss
    . The time stamp for the point in time when the file was created.
z/OS
The PowerExchange Listener uses the following file-naming convention:
prefix
.
sysid
.P
listener_port
.N
nnn
All other PowerExchange batch jobs and started tasks use the following file-naming convention:
prefix
.
job_name
.
job_number
.
sysid
.N
nnn
The variables in these names are:
  • prefix
    is the high-level qualifier or qualifiers that you specify in the PFX parameter. Maximum length of the entire prefix is 16 characters.
  • sysid
    . The system ID of the
    z/OS
    system on which the batch job or started task runs.
  • listener_port
    . The PowerExchange Listener port number.
  • job_name
    . The job name of the batch job or started task.
  • job_number
    . The JES job number, which begins with JOB for batch jobs and STC for started tasks.
  • nnn
    . A generated sequential number from 001 through 999.