Table of Contents

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  1. Preface
  2. Understanding Data Types and Field Properties
  3. Designing Processes
  4. Using and Displaying Data
  5. Designing Guides
  6. Designing Process Objects
  7. Designing Service Connectors
  8. Using Connectors
  9. System Services, Listeners and Connectors

2. Design

2. Design

Decision Step

Decision Step

The following table describes the properties in a Decision step:
Property
Description
Title
The name of the Decision step.
Decision
The guide takes a decision based on the fields and paths you define here.
Select a field name from the list of fields you define under
Start
Fields
.
Enter conditions and values that you want the Decision step to base a decision on.
The conditions available depend on the field that you select.
For example, if you select a field of type
Simple
Text
, the following conditions are available:
  • Equals
  • Starts With
  • Ends With
  • Starts with any of
  • Contains
You can enter text values against the conditions you select.
You can add multiple conditions to a Decision step. Each condition is a potential data path.
For each path that you add, a corresponding branch appears on the UI. Drag branches to rearrange the order in which the branches appear on the UI.
Most Decision steps have an Otherwise path. This path handles execution if no data meets the conditions in your tests.

Evaluating Paths

A guide evaluates conditions based on the criteria you specify. Ensure that you construct paths with non-intersecting conditions.
For example, you create a Decision step with the following paths:
  • Path 1: Field less than or equal to 100.
  • Path 2: Field less than or equal to 75.
  • Path 3: Field less than or equal to 25.
  • Path 4: Otherwise
If the integer field for which the Decision step was created has a value of 25, the Decision step takes path 1. This is because 25 is less than 100 and path 1 is the first option.
To ensure that the Data Decision step follows the "Field less than or equal to 25" path, re-create the paths with the following criteria:
  • Path 1: Integer between 0 and 25
  • Path 2: Integer between 26 and 75.
  • Path 3: Integer between 76 and 100.
  • Path 4: Otherwise
Important
: The guide evaluates conditions in a top-down manner. Ensure that the Otherwise branch is the last path.
A Decision step can lead to another Decision step. For example, a branch could run if an annual income exceeds $100,000. The next decision test along the same path could test if the city is Boston, or otherwise. Using this technique, you use Boolean AND logic because you base the test for the second condition on the true branch of the first condition. In this example, you use the Decision step to set the condition "Annual Revenue exceeds $100,000 AND city is Boston".
Similarly, to support Boolean OR logic, you can add a test for the second condition on any branch.


Updated February 11, 2021