Table of Contents

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  1. Preface
  2. Understanding Data Types and Field Properties
  3. Designing Processes
  4. Using and Displaying Data
  5. Designing Guides
  6. Designing Process Objects
  7. Designing Service Connectors
  8. Using Connectors
  9. System Services, Listeners and Connectors

2. Design

2. Design

Testing the Service Connector

Testing the Service Connector

When you use the Service Connector editor, click
Test
to send a request to the service and display this response data in the
Test
tab:
  • Generate Process Objects
    : click to see the process objects you have defined for the service connector (see below for more information).
  • Result:
    displays the status of the test.
  • HTTP Status:
    displays the HTTP status code.
  • URL
    :
    displays the URL where test data was sent. Any query parameters are added to the URL shown here.
  • Output
    and
    Value
    : show data returned from the service that is assigned to the variables defined in the
    Output
    tab. If you are using XSLT, it is used to extract the data from the payload.
  • Response Payload
    : shows the payload sent to Process Designer from the service (not the full response sent by the service).
  • REST Request
    : shows the data sent to the service from Process Designer.
  • REST Response
    : shows all of the data sent back to Process Designer from the service (whereas the response payload is only a portion of the returned data).
Here, you can see the differences between the payload, request, and response data (for illustration purposes only; the actual test results display only request
or
response data):
If the response includes one or more attachments, you also have an option to download the attachments. The following image shows a multipart response with options to download all the attachments:
The image shows a multipart response with options to download all the attachments.
Generate Process Objects
A process object is usually tied to a specific set of elements. You may sometimes have a large number of identical objects, each of which applies to one set of elements. For example, when you define the data being returned, you create a process object whose sole purpose is to define a subset of returned data. These objects are
non-reusable
and can only be used by a single process object field. The object names are also the name of a field.
You can also create objects that are
reusable
. For example, the refType element in NetSuite has two fields: a name and an internalID. Instead of creating many objects, each of which contains these two fields, you can create a single, reusable process object.
  1. Click
    Generate Process Objects
    to show the Process Objects you have defined for the service connector.
  2. Select the process objects you want to make reusable and then press
    Next
    .
    Process Designer displays a list of generated process objects.
  3. Click
    Finish
    .