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  1. Preface
  2. Understanding Data Types and Field Properties
  3. Designing Processes
  4. Using and Displaying Data
  5. Designing Guides
  6. Designing Process Objects
  7. Designing Service Connectors
  8. Using Connectors
  9. System Services, Listeners and Connectors

2. Design

2. Design

WSDL Files with Qualified Elements

WSDL Files with Qualified Elements

If you have a WSDL file with user defined data types, you can add namespace prefixes and type names to create a WSDL file with qualified elements. You can use this WSDL file to create a service connector.
You can create a service connector from a WSDL file that contains user defined data types. Add namespace prefixes and type names to the user defined data to create a WSDL file with qualified elements. You can use this WSDL file to generate a service connector. The namespace prefix does not appear in the process object and you see a correct payload.
For example, consider a WSDL file that has the user defined elements
RecordId
and
AddressComplete
.
First, define a schema with the type name 'Address'. The following is a sample schema with a complexType name Address:
xs:complexType name="Address"> <xs:sequence> <xs:element minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="1" name="RecordId" type="xs:string" /> <xs:element minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="1" name="AddressComplete" type="xs:string" /> </xs:sequence> </xs:complexType> <s:element minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="1" name="Address" type="tns:Address" />
Next, in the WSDL file, add the namespace prefix 'tns', as in the following sample:
<wsdl:message name="InputRequest"> <wsdl:part name="parameters" element="tns:Address" /> </wsdl:message> <wsdl:portType name="AddressValidationSoap"> <wsdl:operation name="Process"> <wsdl:input message="tns:InputRequest" /> ... </wsdl:operation> </wsdl:portType>
You can use this WSDL file to create a service connector. You will get an Address process object with two fields,
RecordId
and
AddressComplete
.


Updated February 11, 2021