Table of Contents

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  1. Preface
  2. Understanding Data Types and Field Properties
  3. Designing Processes
  4. Using and Displaying Data
  5. Designing Guides
  6. Designing Process Objects
  7. Designing Service Connectors
  8. Using Connectors
  9. System Services, Listeners and Connectors

2. Design

2. Design

Show List: Object Query

Show List: Object Query

Use a query to retrieve object information from all of the objects that are selected by the Where Clause.
After you select
Object Query
, the Process Designer adds the Object Query controls to the
Field Properties
dialog. The
Source
for the
Where Clause
is always Content. While you can enter your condition directly into the text area, it is usually far easier to click the
Add Condition
button.
The difference between a value and what is shown in the display field may not be clear. In many cases, they may be the same. The difference is that the display field is what is shown to the user while the value is what is stored. For example, if a currency value is stored with two places after the decimal, its display could omit these numbers. This distinction is almost always used with ID fields as you want to display something like a Name while using the ID as the actual value that is stored when the user selects it. Also, you may be using code tables where the code is something other than an Object Id. For example, imagine a States object where the code is the two letter abbreviation that is stored as the value in other objects, but you want to display the full name to users when they are selecting State.
After using this dialog, you can edit the information that it added.
Selecting the field from the picklist is suggested as it is sometimes not obvious what the field's internal name is. The text entered here is a standard SQL WHERE clause. Also, this text does not include the WHERE keyword.
If you are creating more than one condition, you can use the standard AND and OR operators. You can also use the NOT operator to invert the meaning of the condition.
Each condition has four parts:
  • The name of a field in the object. In this example, the field is one of those contained within the Account object (this is the object named in the
    Reference To
    area).
  • An operator that Process Designer uses when it compares the field value on the left with values on the right.
  • The kind of data that will be compared. Your choices are Content, Formula, or Field. If you choose
    Field
    , you are comparing the contents within the field in the current object with the contents of the field in the type of object being queried.
  • The data to which the field on the left is being compared. If the source is Content and you click within this area, a small icon appears to the right. After selecting it, Process Designer displays a picklist from which you can select the name of a field in another object that will be used when making the comparison.
To add an SQL LIMIT clause to a query, enter it in the
Where
clause text box. For example, enter "Limit 200" to limit the number of retrieved rows to 200. Add a space after the WHERE information and then enter the SQL LIMIT. Else, enter the SQL LIMIT information on a new line.("Limit" can be in upper, lower, or mixed case.) By default, 100 rows are returned. If your
process
requires more than 100, you must add this clause. However, a read-only object list has a limit of 100 rows, even if you set a query associated with it to more than 100.
If you use a JDBC connection, you can use the ORDER BY unction to sort data.
To use the order by function, click
Order By
and select a field. For example, you can sort a list of names by a person's last name.
You cannot use the order by function to make OData-enabled requests to a JDBC connector.


Updated February 11, 2021