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  1. Preface
  2. Components
  3. Business services
  4. File listeners
  5. Fixed-width file formats
  6. Hierarchical schemas
  7. Intelligent structure models
  8. Mapplets
  9. Saved queries
  10. Shared sequences
  11. User-defined functions

Components

Components

Behavioral differences in file listeners

Behavioral differences in file listeners

Certain behavioral differences exist when a file listener is used in mass ingestion tasks and B2B Gateway partner flows, and in the File Watch Task step of a taskflow.
The following table describes the behavioral differences in file listeners based on where they are used:
Behavior
File listener used in mass ingestion tasks and B2B Gateway partner flows
File listener used in the File Watch Task step of a taskflow
Lifecycle
The file listener runs until the first occurrence of a file event or until the configured end time.
The file listener runs until the first occurrence of a file event or until a timeout occurs.
If a file event does not occur, by default, the taskflow waits for 5 minutes or for the overridden value defined in the
Time Out
input field of the File Watch Task step. The maximum time period for which the taskflow waits is 7 days, after which it times out.
End time of run
The latest end time of the run is at 11:55 PM on the configured end date and time zone, and cannot extend to the following day.
The file listener runs until a file event or timeout occurs, and does not depend on any end date or time zone.
Snapshots
  • All the file listener instances share the same snapshot.
  • Snapshots are never deleted.
  • The file listener run is listed in the
    File Transfer Logs
    tab of the Monitor service with the file listener name as the instance name.
    For example, if the file listener name is
    FL_Delete
    , the instance name that you need to look for in the
    File Transfer Logs
    tab of the Monitor service would be
    FL_Delete
    .
  • Each file listener instance maintains its own snapshot.
  • Snapshots are deleted immediately after the jobs complete.
  • Each file listener run is listed in the
    File Transfer Logs
    tab of the Monitor service.
    Append the monitorJobId that you see in the output fields to the file listener name to find the instance name in the
    File Transfer Logs
    tab of the Monitor service.
    For example, if the monitorJobId is
    7500
    and the name of the file listener is
    FL_Arrive
    , the instance name that you need to look for in the
    File Transfer Logs
    tab of the Monitor service would be
    FL_Arrive-7500
    .
Start and Stop
You can start and stop a file listener instance from Data Integration or by using the File Transfer REST API resources.
When you run a taskflow that contains a File Watch Task step, the associated file listener instance starts. The file listener instance stops when the first occurrence of a file event or a timeout occurs.
When you manually start or stop a file listener instance, the taskflow is not impacted.


Updated August 03, 2020