Table of Contents

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  1. Preface
  2. Welcome to Informatica Process Developer
  3. Using Guide Developer for the First Time
  4. Getting Started with Informatica Process Developer
  5. About Interfaces Service References and Local WSDL
  6. Planning Your BPEL Process
  7. Participants
  8. Implementing a BPMN Task or Event in BPEL
  9. Implementing a BPMN Gateway or Control Flow
  10. Using Variables
  11. Attachments
  12. Using Links
  13. Data Manipulation
  14. Compensation
  15. Correlation
  16. What is Correlation
  17. What is a Correlation Set
  18. Creating Message Properties and Property Aliases
  19. Adding a Correlation Set
  20. Deleting a Correlation Set
  21. Adding Correlations to an Activity
  22. Rules for Declaring and Using Correlation Sets
  23. Correlation Sets and Engine-Managed Correlation
  24. Event Handling
  25. Fault Handling
  26. Simulating and Debugging
  27. Deploying Your Processes
  28. BPEL Unit Testing
  29. Creating POJO and XQuery Custom Functions
  30. Custom Service Interactions
  31. Process Exception Management
  32. Creating Reports for Process Server and Central
  33. Business Event Processing
  34. Process Central Forms and Configuration
  35. Building a Process with a System Service
  36. Human Tasks
  37. BPEL Faults and Reports

2. Designer

2. Designer

Constraints for your Java Project

Constraints for your Java Project

The following requirements exist for Java classes used in a Java Interface implementation:
  • The Java interface's method parameter types are limited to JavaBeans and the following primitive Java types:
    • byte, short, int, long, float, double, boolean, char
    • Byte, Short, Integer, Long, Float, Double, Boolean, Character
    • String
    • BigInteger
    • Date
  • Java checked exceptions are modeled as faults, but the Java method must throw the same exception at runtime for the fault to be properly thrown.
  • The Java interface to the WSDL generator is performed by JAXB, and support for JavaBeans is inherited from JAXB.
  • Arrays and Collections are not currently supported as arguments to Java methods; however, Collections are suwpported if they are wrapped in JavaBeans.
  • The class that implements the interface must have a default constructor.
  • The class that implements the interface can be stateless or stateful. A stateful class is one that is marked implementing the
    java.io.Serializable
    marker interface.
See also
Creating a Java Interface
.


Updated March 30, 2020