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  1. Preface
  2. Welcome to Informatica Process Developer
  3. Using Guide Developer for the First Time
  4. Getting Started with Informatica Process Developer
  5. About Interfaces Service References and Local WSDL
  6. Planning Your BPEL Process
  7. Participants
  8. Implementing a BPMN Task or Event in BPEL
  9. Implementing a BPMN Gateway or Control Flow
  10. Using Variables
  11. Attachments
  12. Using Links
  13. Data Manipulation
  14. Compensation
  15. Correlation
  16. What is Correlation
  17. What is a Correlation Set
  18. Creating Message Properties and Property Aliases
  19. Adding a Correlation Set
  20. Deleting a Correlation Set
  21. Adding Correlations to an Activity
  22. Rules for Declaring and Using Correlation Sets
  23. Correlation Sets and Engine-Managed Correlation
  24. Event Handling
  25. Fault Handling
  26. Simulating and Debugging
  27. Deploying Your Processes
  28. BPEL Unit Testing
  29. Creating POJO and XQuery Custom Functions
  30. Custom Service Interactions
  31. Process Exception Management
  32. Creating Reports for Process Server and Central
  33. Business Event Processing
  34. Process Central Forms and Configuration
  35. Building a Process with a System Service
  36. Human Tasks
  37. BPEL Faults and Reports

2. Designer

2. Designer

Using a REST-based Service

Using a REST-based Service

You can create web service interaction activities in BPEL that can handle messages based on the Representational State Transfer (REST) architecture rather than WSDL operations. This means that you do not need your own WSDL file in order to create certain types of BPEL processes. You can simply instantiate a process with a request that looks like the following example:
http://localhost:8080/active-bpel/services/REST/lookUpWeather/mass/waltham
REST is a style of architecture for describing how resources are defined and addressed on systems such as the World Wide Web. Using REST, you can send and receive REST-based messages over HTTP without an additional messaging layer such as SOAP.
You can also access partner REST services from a BPEL process.
The idea of REST is that clients and services can communicate over HTTP to exchange representations of resources. A
resource
is any item of interest, made accessible through some URL on the network. In BPEL, a
representation
is an XML document with optional attachments of a different content type.
A BPEL process can send and receive a REST request. When a REST request is sent to the process, Process Server converts it to a standard WSDL message. When the process invokes a REST service, a standard WSDL message is converted into a REST request. The response is a document representing the requested resource. The document type returned is defined by the Content-Type header of the HTTP response.
To get started with REST, you need the following:
  • A BPEL project that imports
    aeREST.wsdl
    and
    aeREST.xsd
  • For invokes you need:
    • The URL of the REST resource you will address
    • The HTTP method you want to invoke
    • The content type of the resource representation you will return
    • For XML content returned, an optional schema for the returned message (for example, atom schema, vender specific) to address the content within the BPEL process
    • The query parameters specified by the REST service you want to address
See Also:


Updated March 30, 2020