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  1. Preface
  2. Welcome to Informatica Process Developer
  3. Using Guide Developer for the First Time
  4. Getting Started with Informatica Process Developer
  5. About Interfaces Service References and Local WSDL
  6. Planning Your BPEL Process
  7. Participants
  8. Implementing a BPMN Task or Event in BPEL
  9. Implementing a BPMN Gateway or Control Flow
  10. Using Variables
  11. Attachments
  12. Using Links
  13. Data Manipulation
  14. Compensation
  15. Correlation
  16. What is Correlation
  17. What is a Correlation Set
  18. Creating Message Properties and Property Aliases
  19. Adding a Correlation Set
  20. Deleting a Correlation Set
  21. Adding Correlations to an Activity
  22. Rules for Declaring and Using Correlation Sets
  23. Correlation Sets and Engine-Managed Correlation
  24. Event Handling
  25. Fault Handling
  26. Simulating and Debugging
  27. Deploying Your Processes
  28. BPEL Unit Testing
  29. Creating POJO and XQuery Custom Functions
  30. Custom Service Interactions
  31. Process Exception Management
  32. Creating Reports for Process Server and Central
  33. Business Event Processing
  34. Process Central Forms and Configuration
  35. Building a Process with a System Service
  36. Human Tasks
  37. BPEL Faults and Reports

2. Designer

2. Designer

Scope

Scope

BPMN Implementation: Embedded Subprocess
The Scope activity provides a context for a subset of activities. It can contain ault, event, and compensation handling for activities nested within it and can also have a set of defined variables and a correlation set.
A Scope can encompass a logical unit of work, making it manageable to execute, and then, if need be, reverse an activity. For example, if a customer cancels a paid travel reservation, the money must be returned, and the reservation must be canceled without affecting other reservations. By enclosing activities in a Scope, you can create the structure and conditions in which to manage activities as a unit.
Each Scope has a primary activity that can be a complex structured activity.
Required Properties
Optional Properties
Isolated. Refer to
Setting Isolated to "Yes" in a Scope
Name. See
Selecting Activity Labels
Join Condition. See
Creating a Join Condition for an Incoming Link
Suppress Join Failure. See
Process Properties
Comment. See
Adding Comments to a Process
Documentation. See
Adding Documentation to a Process
See
Setting Visual Properties and Using Your Own Library of Images
Execution State. See
Viewing the Execution State of an Activity or Link
Extension Attributes and Extension Elements. See
Declaring Extension Elements and Attributes
.
To build a Scope:
  1. From the
    Control Flow
    palette, drag an
    Embedded Subprocess
    activity to the Process Editor canvas.
    You can add a background color to the embedded subprocess if it is collapsed. Right-mouse click on the embedded subprocess and select Collapse Container. The color property will appear in the Properties view.
  2. In the Properties view, set Isolated to Yes or No.
  3. On the Process Editor canvas, right-mouse click the Scope activity to add declarations, including:
    • Correlation Set. For more information, see
      Correlation
      .
    • Variable. For more information, see
      Using Variables
      .
    • Participants. For more information, see
      Using the Participants View
      .
  4. From the
    Handlers
    palette, add event fault and compensation handlers:
    • Compensation Handler. For more information, see
      Compensate
      and
      Compensation
      .
    • Event Handlers. For more information, see
      Event Handling
      .
    • Fault Handlers. For more information, see
      Fault Handling
      .
    • Termination Handler. For more information, see
      Using a Termination Handler for a Scope
  5. From the
    Task
    palette, drag activities to the Scope container, and select activity properties.
The following illustration shows a sample scope activity with all handlers displayed.
You can save an activity, or group of activities to the Custom palette for reuse. Because a Scope can be complex, it is a good candidate for reuse. For more information, see
Creating a Custom Activity
.
XML Syntax
<scope isolated="yes|no"? exitOnStandardFault="yes|no"? standard-attributes> standard-elements <variables>? ... </variables> <partnerLinks>? ... </partnerLinks> <correlationSets>? ... </correlationSets> <messageExchanges>? ... </messageExchanges> <faultHandlers>? ... </faultHandlers> <compensationHandler>? ... </compensationHandler> <eventHandlers>? ... </eventHandlers> <terminationHandler>? ... </terminationHandler> activity </scope>
Example:
<scope isolated="no"> <faultHandler> <reply>...</reply> </faultHandler> <flow> <invoke partnerLink="Seller" portType="Sell:Purchasing" operation="SyncPurchase" inputVariable="sendPO" outputVariable="getResponse"/> <invoke partnerLink="Shipper" portType="Ship:Orders" operation="OrderShipment" inputVariable="sendShipOrder" outputVariable="shipAck"/> </flow> </scope>
See also:
  • Setting Isolated to "Yes" in a Scope
  • Lifecycle of a Scope


Updated March 30, 2020