Table of Contents

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  1. Preface
  2. Welcome to Informatica Process Developer
  3. Using Guide Developer for the First Time
  4. Getting Started with Informatica Process Developer
  5. About Interfaces Service References and Local WSDL
  6. Planning Your BPEL Process
  7. Participants
  8. Implementing a BPMN Task or Event in BPEL
  9. Implementing a BPMN Gateway or Control Flow
  10. Using Variables
  11. Attachments
  12. Using Links
  13. Data Manipulation
  14. Compensation
  15. Correlation
  16. What is Correlation
  17. What is a Correlation Set
  18. Creating Message Properties and Property Aliases
  19. Adding a Correlation Set
  20. Deleting a Correlation Set
  21. Adding Correlations to an Activity
  22. Rules for Declaring and Using Correlation Sets
  23. Correlation Sets and Engine-Managed Correlation
  24. Event Handling
  25. Fault Handling
  26. Simulating and Debugging
  27. Deploying Your Processes
  28. BPEL Unit Testing
  29. Creating POJO and XQuery Custom Functions
  30. Custom Service Interactions
  31. Process Exception Management
  32. Creating Reports for Process Server and Central
  33. Business Event Processing
  34. Process Central Forms and Configuration
  35. Building a Process with a System Service
  36. Human Tasks
  37. BPEL Faults and Reports

2. Designer

2. Designer

Creating an Activity by Starting with a WSDL Interface

Creating an Activity by Starting with a WSDL Interface

Select the activity type to create. Select Receive-Reply to create a matching Reply for the Receive. To activate the OnMessage activity, drop the Operation Wizard icon onto a Pick activity. For an OnEvent, drop the Wizard onto a process or scope Event handler. Select a fault name declared in the referenced WSDL file. Select an existing fault variable or create a new one. Select No Variable to use a message part for the activity.
Process Developer has a shortcut for you to create activities for an executable process. You can create a Web interaction activity by selecting an operation from the Participants or Interfaces view and completing a wizard.
For a key productivity starting point, see
Using the Participants View
.
Starting with a Partner Link Type Definition
If your WSDL file does not yet include partner link type definitions, you can select an operation from a port type.
  1. Display the Partner Link Type element from a WSDL. The illustration shows an example of the loanProcess port type prior to the partner link type creation.
  2. Select an operation to receive from, reply to, or invoke.
  3. Drag the operation to one of the following locations:
    • Anywhere on Process Editor canvas to create a receive, reply, reply with fault, or invoke
    • Inside a scope on the Process Editor canvas if you want to create scope-level partner links or variables
    • Pick activity to create an onMessage and/or Reply
    • Event handler to create an onEvent and/or Reply
      The list that appears on the Activity Type page varies depending on the location on which you dropped the operation. The following illustration shows the activities for a process or scope-level location, not for a pick activity or event handler. The Receive-Reply combination is listed because the WSDL operation has both input and output messages. Similarly, a Reply with Fault is listed because a fault is declared for the WSDL operation.
  4. Select the activity type. As a shortcut, you can select Receive-Reply to set up matching activities at the same time. Click
    Next
    .
    If you are creating a Reply with Fault, see Creating a Reply with Fault.
  5. Accept an existing process-level or ancestor scope partner link you have already defined in your process, if available, or type in a new one. A partner link identifies the roles played by the process and service. If you are creating a new partner link inside a scope, you can select Enclosing Scope for the declaration of the Location, making the partner link locally available only, instead of globally available to the process. Click
    Next
    .
    You can edit the partner link and other wizard information after you have finished the wizard.
  6. Choose one of the following for the input variable, and then click
    Next
    :
    • Use an existing variable name associated with the operation's input message
    • Type in a new name for the input variable in your process. Select the Location for the declaration: Process or Enclosing Scope. Specify the variable type: Message or Element. If the variable is a message type with a single part defined by an element, you can select Element.
    • Select No Variable if the variable is for an empty message or you want to create a fromPart or toPart for the activity. See
      From Variable to Part
      for details.
  7. For an invoke or reply activity, repeat step 6 for the output variable name. Click
    Finish
    .
Creating a Reply with Fault
If you select Reply with Fault from the Operation Wizard, complete the following steps.
  1. Select a fault declared for the operation, and click
    Next
    .
  2. Make one of the following selections for the fault variable:
    • Use an existing variable name associated with the operation fault variable
    • Type in a new name for the fault variable in your process. Select the Location for the declaration: Process or Enclosing Scope. Specify the variable type: Message or Element. If the variable is a message type with a single part defined by an element, you can select Element.
    • Select No Variable if the variable is for an empty message or you want to create a fromPart or toPart for the activity. See
      From Variable to Part
      for details.
Starting without a Partner Link Type Definition
If the selected operation is not yet associated with a partner link type, you can select an operation from a port type. A wizard appears so you can create a partner link type definition and add it to an existing WSDL file or create a new WSDL file. For more information, see
Partner Link Type
.


Updated March 30, 2020