Table of Contents

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  1. Preface
  2. Welcome to Informatica Process Developer
  3. Using Guide Developer for the First Time
  4. Getting Started with Informatica Process Developer
  5. About Interfaces Service References and Local WSDL
  6. Planning Your BPEL Process
  7. Participants
  8. Implementing a BPMN Task or Event in BPEL
  9. Implementing a BPMN Gateway or Control Flow
  10. Using Variables
  11. Attachments
  12. Using Links
  13. Data Manipulation
  14. Compensation
  15. Correlation
  16. What is Correlation
  17. What is a Correlation Set
  18. Creating Message Properties and Property Aliases
  19. Adding a Correlation Set
  20. Deleting a Correlation Set
  21. Adding Correlations to an Activity
  22. Rules for Declaring and Using Correlation Sets
  23. Correlation Sets and Engine-Managed Correlation
  24. Event Handling
  25. Fault Handling
  26. Simulating and Debugging
  27. Deploying Your Processes
  28. BPEL Unit Testing
  29. Creating POJO and XQuery Custom Functions
  30. Custom Service Interactions
  31. Process Exception Management
  32. Creating Reports for Process Server and Central
  33. Business Event Processing
  34. Process Central Forms and Configuration
  35. Building a Process with a System Service
  36. Human Tasks
  37. BPEL Faults and Reports

2. Designer

2. Designer

Input Variable

Input Variable

The input for an invoke, reply, or people activity can be constructed within the Input (or Data) tab of the activity's
Properties
view. Use the Input (or Data) tab of the invoke, reply or people activity as follows:
The input for an invoke or reply activity can be constructed within the Input (or Data) tab of the activity's
Properties
view. Use the Input (or Data) tab of the invoke or reply as follows:
Assignment Type
  • Single Variable
    . Select a variable if no input preparation is desired via an assign activity. Select an existing process variable or select New Variable. The variable must be of the operation's input message type, or, if the operation requires only one part, the variable's type can be the element type of the one part.
  • XPaths
    . Select XPaths if you want to use a table to map from data within existing variables or a literal to the contents of the input message. The table uses XPath expressions that allow you to select nodes from a variable to assign to the input variable as well as compute values (strings, numbers, or Boolean values) from the content of variable. See
    Adding XPaths
    below.
  • XQuery
    . Select XQuery if you want to fill each input message part with a single query written in the XQuery expression language. This language allows you to create a query that looks like an XML document, but where pieces of the document are constructed using a superset of the XPath expression syntax. It supplements XPath with a SQL-like "FLWOR expression" (FOR, LET, WHERE, ORDER BY, and RETURN) for performing joins. See
    Adding XQuery
    below.
For example XPath and XQuery expressions, see
Selecting XPath or XQuery for Expression Building
.
Tip:
If you want to use Javascript to prepare some or all of an input message, create an assign activity instead of using the Input tab. Each copy operation in an assign can use a different expression language.
Adding XPaths
  1. On the Input (or Data) tab of an invoke, reply, or people activity, ensure that the Assignment Type is XPaths.
  2. On the Input (or Data) tab of an invoke or reply activity, ensure that the Assignment Type is XPaths.
  3. In the table, select
    Add
    to populate the b
     
    column.
  4. In the To Path column, select the child node of the part, if needed.
  5. In the E/L column, select the From type: Expression or Literal.
  6. In the From column, select the
    Dialog (...) Button
    at the end of the table cell. For a literal, select
    Generate
    and notice that the literal XML document is generated for you based on the type needed for the chosen To Part and To Path. To add an expression, fill in the Expression text box. For a shortcut, see
    Using Content Assist
    .
    For more information on expression languages, see
    Using the Expression Builder
    .
    The following is an example of a literal mapping:
  7. Optionally, in
    Copy Attachments
    , select a variable that can have attachments that you want to copy to or from. Note that you must copy all attachments. If you want only some attachments, you can add an Assign activity before the activity. See
    Adding an Attachment
    for details.
  8. When you use XPaths, a temporary variable called
    parameters
    is created to contain the parts. For details, see
    Viewing Container Variables
    below.
Adding XQuery
For easy XQuery development, see
Writing XQuery Functions
.
  1. On the Input (or Data) tab of an invoke, reply, or people activity, ensure that the Assignment Type is XQuery.
    Notice that a XML template is generated for the message part. If desired, after editing the document, you can regenerate the template.
  2. Fill in the XQuery expressions as desired for each element. Optionally, select
    Builder
    to open the Query Builder to insert expressions or functions into the query.
    The following is an example of an XQuery mapping.
  3. Optionally, copy attachments, as described above in the XPaths discussion.
Viewing Container Variables
Iif you use XPaths or XQuery, a container variable is added to the Process Variables view, called
parameters
. Similarly, if you are copying attachments to the input variable, you will see the container variable,
attachmentCopyResult
. These variables are hidden by default since they are used only temporarily at runtime to process parts of a full variable. Select
Show Internal Variables
to make them visible.


Updated March 30, 2020