Table of Contents

  1. Preface
  2. Introduction to Informatica Edge Data Streaming
  3. Licenses
  4. Using Informatica Administrator
  5. Creating and Managing the Edge Data Streaming Service
  6. Edge Data Streaming Entity Types
  7. Edge Data Streaming Nodes
  8. Data Connections
  9. Working With Data Flows
  10. Managing the Edge Data Streaming Components
  11. Security
  12. High Availability
  13. Disaster Recovery
  14. Monitoring Edge Data Streaming Entities
  15. Troubleshooting
  16. Frequently Asked Questions
  17. Regular Expressions
  18. Command Line Program
  19. Configuring Edge Data Streaming to Work With a ZooKeeper Observer
  20. Glossary

User Guide

User Guide

Regular Expressions

A regular expression describes a range or pattern of values that a filter condition can contain.
The following table describes the metacharacters that you can use in a regular expression:
Metacharacter
Description
.
Matches any single character.
[ ]
Indicates a character class. Matches any character inside the brackets. For example, [abc] matches “a,” “b,” and “c.”
^
If this metacharacter occurs at the start of a character class, it negates the character class. A negated character class matches any character except those inside the brackets. For example, [^abc] matches all characters except “a,” “b,” and “c.”
If this metacharacter occurs at the beginning of the regular expression, it matches the beginning of the input. For example, ^[abc] matches the input that begins with “a,” “b,” or “c.”
-
Indicates a range of characters in a character class. For example, [0-9] matches any of the digits “0” through “9.”
?
Indicates that the preceding expression to this metacharacter is optional. It matches the preceding expression zero or one time. For example, [0-9][0-9]? matches “2” and “12.”
+
Indicates that the preceding expression matches one or more times. For example, [0-9]+ matches “1,” “13,” “666,” and similar combinations.
*
Indicates that the preceding expression matches zero or more times. For example, the input <abc*> matches <abc>, <abc123>, and similar combinations that contains <abc> as the preceding expression.
??, +?, *?
Modified versions of ?, +, and *. These match as little as possible, unlike the versions that match as much as possible. For example, the input “<abc><def>,” <.*?> matches “<abc>” and the input <.*> matches “<abc><def>.”
( )
Grouping operator. For example, (\d+,)*\d+ matches a list of numbers separated by commas such as “1” or “1,23,456.”
{ }
Indicates a match group.
\
An escape character, which interprets the next metacharacter literally. For example, [0-9]+ matches one or more digits, but [0-9]\+ matches a digit followed by a plus character. Also used for abbreviations such as \a for any alphanumeric character.
If \ is followed by a number n, it matches the nth match group, starting from 0. For example, <{.*?}>.*?</\0> matches “<head>Contents</head>”.
In C++ string literals, two backslashes must be used: “\\+,” “\\a,” “<{.*?}>.*?</\\0>.”
$
At the end of a regular expression, this character matches the end of the input. For example, [0-9]$ matches a digit at the end of the input.
|
Alternation operator that separates two expressions, one of which matches. For example, T|the matches “The” or “the.”
!
Negation operator. The expression following ! does not match the input. For example, a!b matches “a” not followed by “b.”
The following table describes the abbreviations that you can use in the regular expressions:
Abbreviation
Definition
\a
Any alphanumeric character, ([a-zA-Z0-9]).
\b
White space (blank), ([ \\t]).
\c
Any alphabetic character, ([a-zA-Z]).
\d
Any decimal digit, ([0-9]).
\h
Any hexadecimal digit, ([0-9a-fA-F]).
\n
Newline, (\r|(\r?\n)).
\q
Quoted string, (\”[^\”]*\”)|(\’[^\’]*\’).
\w
Simple word, ([a-zA-Z]+).
\z
Integer, ([0-9+]).

Updated March 19, 2019


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