Table of Contents

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  1. Preface
  2. Part 1: On-Prem Operations
  3. Part 2: Parameter and Element Reference
  4. Appendix A: Geocode Countries
  5. Appendix B: Certified Mode Values

On-Premises Developer Guide

On-Premises Developer Guide

Transliteration Limitations

Transliteration Limitations

If the source language has fewer syllables and does not have exact matches in other languages, transliteration becomes difficult. Japanese is an example for languages that are difficult to transliterate.
Most languages use a subset of the sounds a person could produce. Different languages use different subsets. If a sound used by one language cannot be represented correctly in a non-native script, then it needs to be approximated. This approximation might be inaccurate if the sounds in the source and destination languages are significantly different.
The following table shows how transliteration can be inaccurate when the words are transliterated from English (Latin) to Japanese (Katakana) and back to English (Latin):
Original Latin (English)
Katakana (Japanese)
Transliterated Latin
Philippines
フィリピン
Firipin
Düsseldorf
デュッセルドルフ
Dyusserudorufu
Beethoven
ベートーベン
Betoben
Some Kanji characters in the first name of the contact in Japan addresses are incorrectly transliterated into Arabic numerals instead of Latin alphabets.
The following table shows the Kanji numerals that Informatica Address Verification might incorrectly translate into Arabic numerals instead of Latin alphabets:
Kanji Numeral
Arabic Equivalent
Latin Transliteration
1
ichi
2
ni
3
san
4
yon
5
go
6
roku
7
nana
8
hachi
9
kyū
10


Updated May 13, 2021