Table of Contents

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  1. Preface
  2. Performance Tuning Overview
  3. Bottlenecks
  4. Optimizing the Target
  5. Optimizing the Source
  6. Optimizing Mappings
  7. Optimizing Transformations
  8. Optimizing Sessions
  9. Optimizing Grid Deployments
  10. Optimizing the PowerCenter Components
  11. Optimizing the System
  12. Using Pipeline Partitions
  13. Performance Counters

Performance Tuning Guide

Performance Tuning Guide

Using Processor Binding

Using Processor Binding

In a multi-processor UNIX environment, the Integration Service may use a large amount of system resources if you run a large number of sessions. As a result, other applications on the machine may not have enough system resources available. You can use processor binding to control processor usage by the Integration Service process node. Also, if the source and target database are on the same machine, use processor binding to limit the resources used by the database.
In a Sun Solaris environment, the system administrator can create and manage a processor set using the psrset command. The system administrator can then use the pbind command to bind the Integration Service to a processor set so the processor set only runs the Integration Service. The Sun Solaris environment also provides the psrinfo command to display details about each configured processor and the psradm command to change the operational status of processors. For more information, see the system administrator and Sun Solaris documentation.
In an AIX environment, system administrators can use the Workload Manager in AIX 5L to manage system resources during peak demands. The Workload Manager can allocate resources and manage CPU, memory, and disk I/O bandwidth. For more information, see the system administrator and AIX documentation.