Table of Contents

Search

  1. Preface
  2. Introduction to PowerExchange
  3. DBMOVER Configuration File
  4. Netport Jobs
  5. PowerExchange Message Logs and Destination Overrides
  6. SMF Statistics Logging and Reporting
  7. PowerExchange Security
  8. Secure Sockets Layer Support
  9. PowerExchange Alternative Network Security
  10. PowerExchange Nonrelational SQL
  11. PowerExchange Globalization
  12. Using the PowerExchange ODBC Drivers
  13. PowerExchange Datatypes and Conversion Matrix
  14. Appendix A: DTL__CAPXTIMESTAMP Time Stamps
  15. Appendix B: PowerExchange Glossary

Example of IMS SSID and PSB Substitution for an IMS Netport Job

Example of IMS SSID and PSB Substitution for an IMS Netport Job

This example demonstrates how to use the %PSBNAME substitution variable in the netport JCL to substitute in PSB name values for a bulk data movement session.
This example uses the following assumptions:
  • The source data map that was imported into PowerCenter uses the DL/1 BATCH access method. It does not specify a PSB name.
  • The IMSJCL member for the netport job includes the %PSBNAME variable:
    //STEP1 EXEC PROC=IMSBATCH,NBA=5,OBA=5, // IMSID=%IMSID, // MBR=DTLLST3I,REGION=32M,PSB=
    %PSBNAME
  • The DBMOVER member contains a NETPORT statement that includes a specific PSB name:
    NETPORT=(NODE1,26580,,,"PWX.PROD1.RUNLIB(IMSJCL)",
    DTLPB05
    )
When the netport job runs, PowerExchange replaces the %PSBNAME variable in the JCL with "DLTPBO5" from the NETPORT statement.
If you use an ODBA data map with an access method override, the %PSBNAME variable is replaced by the value from the data map. If you specify a PSB name override when you perform a database row test or run a PowerCenter session, the override takes precedence over the value in the NETPORT statement and in the data map.
You now need to use the PSB name of "DTLB06" but cannot define another NETPORT statement in the DBMOVER member because the maximum limit of ten statements has been reached. Instead, you define the
IMS PSBNAME Override
attribute in the PowerCenter session-level properties for the source. The netport job then uses the override PSB name instead of the PSB name from the NETPORT statement. When you use session-level overrides, you do not need to edit the DBMOVER member and restart the PowerExchange Listener.
After migrating your test environment to production, you want the execute the same netport PROC on the production system. In this case, you define the
IMS SSID Override
attribute in the PowerCenter session-level properties for the source.