Table of Contents

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  1. Preface
  2. Understanding Pipeline Partitioning
  3. Partition Points
  4. Partition Types
  5. Pushdown Optimization
  6. Pushdown Optimization and Transformations
  7. Real-time Processing
  8. Commit Points
  9. Row Error Logging
  10. Workflow Recovery
  11. Stopping and Aborting
  12. Concurrent Workflows
  13. Grid Processing
  14. Load Balancer
  15. Workflow Variables
  16. Parameters and Variables in Sessions
  17. Parameter Files
  18. FastExport
  19. External Loading
  20. FTP
  21. Session Caches
  22. Incremental Aggregation
  23. Session Log Interface
  24. Understanding Buffer Memory
  25. High Precision Data

Advanced Workflow Guide

Advanced Workflow Guide

Tips for Parameters and Parameter Files

Tips for Parameters and Parameter Files

Use a single parameter file to group parameter information for related sessions.
When sessions are likely to use the same database connection or directory, you might want to include them in the same parameter file. When connections or directories change, you can update information for all sessions by editing one parameter file.
Use pmcmd and multiple parameter files for sessions with regular cycles.
Sometimes you reuse session parameters in a cycle. For example, you might run a session against a sales database everyday, but run the same session against sales and marketing databases once a week. You can create separate parameter files for each session run. Instead of changing the parameter file in the session properties each time you run the weekly session, use
pmcmd
to specify the parameter file to use when you start the session.
Use reject file and session log parameters in conjunction with target file or target database connection parameters.
When you use a target file or target database connection parameter with a session, you can keep track of reject files by using a reject file parameter. You can also use the session log parameter to write the session log to the target machine.
Use a resource to verify the session runs on a node that has access to the parameter file.
In the Administrator tool, you can define a file resource for each node that has access to the parameter file and configure the Integration Service to check resources. Then, edit the session that uses the parameter file and assign the resource. When you run the workflow, the Integration Service runs the session with the required resource on a node that has the resource available.
You can override initial values of workflow variables for a session by defining them in a session section.
If a workflow contains an Assignment task that changes the value of a workflow variable, the next session in the workflow uses the latest value of the variable as the initial value for the session. To override the initial value for the session, define a new value for the variable in the session section of the parameter file.
You can define parameters and variables using other parameters and variables.
For example, in the parameter file, you can define session parameter $PMSessionLogFile using a service process variable as follows:
$PMSessionLogFile=$PMSessionLogDir/TestRun.txt


Updated August 27, 2020