Table of Contents

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  1. Preface
  2. Welcome to Informatica Process Developer
  3. Using Guide Developer for the First Time
  4. Getting Started with Informatica Process Developer
  5. About Interfaces Service References and Local WSDL
  6. Planning Your BPEL Process
  7. Participants
  8. Implementing a BPMN Task or Event in BPEL
  9. Implementing a BPMN Gateway or Control Flow
  10. Using Variables
  11. Attachments
  12. Using Links
  13. Data Manipulation
  14. Compensation
  15. Correlation
  16. What is Correlation
  17. What is a Correlation Set
  18. Creating Message Properties and Property Aliases
  19. Adding a Correlation Set
  20. Deleting a Correlation Set
  21. Adding Correlations to an Activity
  22. Rules for Declaring and Using Correlation Sets
  23. Correlation Sets and Engine-Managed Correlation
  24. Event Handling
  25. Fault Handling
  26. Simulating and Debugging
  27. Deploying Your Processes
  28. BPEL Unit Testing
  29. Creating POJO and XQuery Custom Functions
  30. Custom Service Interactions
  31. Process Exception Management
  32. Creating Reports for Process Server and Central
  33. Business Event Processing
  34. Process Central Forms and Configuration
  35. Building a Process with a System Service
  36. Human Tasks
  37. BPEL Faults and Reports

2. Designer

2. Designer

Using the Process Developer Debug View

Using the Process Developer Debug View

The Process Developer Debug perspective contains a Debug view that lets you manage the running or stepping through of a BPEL process that you have created or imported into Process Developer. It displays an execution tree associated with the process you are debugging.
The Process Developer Debug view is based on the Eclipse Debug view, and not all functions apply to Process Developer. You will notice that some icons, options, and preferences are unavailable in Process Developer.
The following illustration shows a sample Debug view. The table describes function keys available.
1
Resume (F8 key)
Resumes a suspended thread. Allow the process to run until the next breakpoint is encountered or until the process is completed.
2
Terminate
Terminates the selected debug target
3
Step Into (F5 Key)
The process executes until the next activity in the process is reached. If the activity is a container, such as a scope, if, while or for each, the execution of each activity in the container takes place.
Tip:
You can also step into an invoke activity that is a subprocess. For details, see Selecting an Invoke Subprocess for Simulation.
4
Step Over (F6 Key)
The process executes until the next activity in the process is reached. If a breakpoint is encountered, the execution suspends at the breakpoint.
5
Step Return (F7 Key)
Use this to return from a container that has been stepped into. Even though the step returns from the container, the remainder of the activities in the container are still executed.
In addition to the toolbar options, there are more options on the right mouse menu of a simulation thread item. The following illustration shows only the additional options, not all the options available on the right mouse menu.
Copy Stack
Copies the selected stack of suspended threads as well as the state of the running threads to the clipboard
Terminate and Remove
Terminates the selected debug target and removes it from the view
Relaunch
Start a new simulation
Terminate All
Terminates all active simulations in the view


Updated March 30, 2020